Internal Migration (Arrivals and Departures) by Territorial Authority for the population aged 65+ years

These data are for the population aged 65+ years only, at each census.

With the exclusion of data for the Chatham Islands (where numbers were too small to disaggregate), these maps illustrate where movers aged 65+ years from each of New Zealand’s remaining 66 territorial authority areas came from (Internal Arrivals), and went to (Internal Departures), between 2001 and 2006, and 2008 and 2013, based on the Census question ‘where did you live five years ago?’.

The index ‘percentage share’ refers to the proportion of internal arrivals (aged 65+ years) from each other territorial authority area, enumerated as living in their new area at each census, and the proportion of leavers from that area to each other territorial authority area, in the same years.

Also shown in the accompanying information box to each map are the number and proportion of people aged 65+ years who were Stayers (people who were enumerated as residing in the same territorial authority area or region five years previously), the number and proportion living overseas five years previously and a summary of net internal migration (internal arrivals minus internal departures).

Because those living overseas at the time of the census cannot be enumerated, there are no equivalent data for overseas departures and thus neither net overseas migration nor Total Net Migration can be calculated. Note that for those aged 65+ years, arrival from overseas will in many cases mean ‘return from holiday’.

Key observations: The data indicate that the majority of Internal Arrivals aged 65+ years move to ‘sunbelt’ areas. This contrasts with the data for the total population where both Arrivals and Leavers tend to concentrate around the territorial authority area from which they came or went to, indicating the presence of labour market areas.

Other key points:

  • At the 2013 Census, Stayers aged 65+ years ranged from 81 to 90 per cent of each area’s Census population aged 65+ years, indicating relative stability. The highest proportion was for Buller District and the lowest for Waimakariri District. Stayer proportions were somewhat lower at the 2006 Census, ranging from 72 to 91 per cent (respectively for Hauraki District and Grey District).
  • At the 2013 Census, the TA with the highest proportion of Internal Arrivals aged 65+ years was Waimakariri District (accounting for 17.3 per cent of the TAs 2013 65+ year population) and the lowest was Wairoa District (2.1 per cent). At the 2006 Census, the TA with the highest proportion was Hauraki District (21.7 per cent), and the lowest was Auckland (2.8 per cent).
  • Although Auckland’s 65+ year population was augmented by Internal Arrivals at each Census, net Internal Migration at 65+ years was negative in both cases, -3,044 at the 2006 Census and -1,786 at the 2013 Census.
  • At the 2013 Census, Net Internal Migration for the 65+ year population was highest for Kaipara District (accounting for 7.8 per cent of the district’s 2016 population aged 65+ years) and lowest (negative) for Ruapehu District (-6.5 per cent). At the 2006 Census, Hauraki District had the highest proportion (9.4 per cent) and Mackenzie District the lowest (-18.1 per cent). Between 2008 and 2013, 20 TAs (30 per cent) experienced negative net migration of those aged 65+ years, a reduction over the previous period when 30 TAs (47.8 per cent) experienced negative net migration.
  • At both the 2006 and 2013 Censuses the TA with the highest proportion of population aged 65+ years that had been overseas five years previously was Queenstown-Lakes District (respectively 9.4 and 4.0 per cent). In 2013, the lowest proportion was for Rangitikei District (0.5 per cent) and in 2006, for Grey District (3.8 per cent). Proportions ‘overseas five years ago’ were generally higher at the 2006 Census than in 2013, and this held true at both 65+ years and for the total population.
  • Prorating the ‘lived elsewhere in New Zealand/not further defined’ and ‘residence 5 years ago not stated’ categories (see methodological notes) generally resulted in increasing the Stayer percentage and reducing any net internal migration loss.

Data Sources and 'Mover-Stayer' Methodology

These data were originally sourced from Statistics New Zealand (2014) and are based on the Census question ‘where did you usually live five years ago?’ Because some people fail to provide this information on their census form, a methodological decision was made to prorate the data for those people according to the local (regional or territorial authority area) distribution for those whose address five years ago was stated (see disclaimer for additional information).

Data for people who gave both their current and past address were categorised as either:

  • Stayers (people living in the same region or territorial authority area at both censuses—although they may have moved elsewhere within that area, and/or out of the area and back in, between the censuses);
  • Internal Arrivals (people living in the specified region or territorial authority area who elsewhere in New Zealand five years ago);
  • Internal Departures (people who lived in the specified region or territorial authority area five years ago, but now live elsewhere in New Zealand);
  • Overseas Arrivals (people who were living overseas five years ago).

Those who did not provide their current and/or previous address are recorded as either 'living elsewhere in NZ/not further defined', or 'not elsewhere included/address five years ago not stated'. The process for prorating these data according to the regional or territorial authority area distribution for those whose address five years ago was stated, was as follows:

  • Apportioning of ‘Lived Elsewhere in New Zealand/Not Further Defined’: Both Stayers in each region or territorial authority area, and Arrivals from each other region or territorial authority area, were summed and their distribution calculated as a percentage. This percentage was then applied to the number ‘living elsewhere in New Zealand/not further defined’, and the resulting number added to the number having stated their previous residence.
  • Apportioning of ‘Not Elsewhere included/Address Five Years Ago Not Stated’: Stayers in each region or territorial authority area, Arrivals from each other region or territorial authority area, and Overseas Arrivals, were summed and their distribution calculated as a percentage. This percentage was then applied to the number ‘not elsewhere included/address five years ago not stated’, and the resulting number added to the number having stated their previous residence.

Disclaimer: The methodological assumption that people who ‘lived elsewhere in New Zealand/not further defined’ or ‘not elsewhere included/address five years ago not stated’ have the same residential distribution as those who did specify their previous address, may be incorrect. We took this approach because it is preferable to calculating movements based on ‘known’ previous residence only, as these proportions differ substantially for each region and territorial authority area. The resulting data should thus be viewed as a best approximation of the situation, and will differ slightly from the raw data that Statistics New Zealand publishes, and other analysts may generate. The 2006 and 2013 data are based on 2013 territorial authority area boundaries.